EXCLUSIVE

Chris Brown and Baby Mama Custody War Launched Over Child Support for Royalty

Chris Brown‘s baby mama has gone back to court demanding more money for raising their 4-year-old daughter, and the move has set off an explosive battle between the two parents.

Sources close to the case tell The Blast Nia Guzman recently hired attorney Lisa Bloom and filed documents in California to modify the child support she receives from Brown for their daughter, Royalty.

The hip-hop star, who currently gets supervised visitation, pays $2,500 per month in support and another $4,000 for a nanny, who happens to be Nia’s mother.

According to the documents, Nia claims Brown has earned an average of $4,269,067 over the last two years, which can be broken down to just over $350,000 per month. Under the guidelines for child support in California, which is based off income, Nia believes she should receive $21,000 plus per month.

She also claims with that new figure, she is owed $250,000 in retroactive child support.

However, the “Loyal” singer believes she’s just going for a money grab, and he plans on fighting her over the increase.

Royalty’s mom explains that she’s underwater with monthly expenses and bills, including $3,300 in rent, $3,500 in food and $4,500 in clothes and entertainment for a 4-year-old.  She says things have been so bad, that she was forced to hit up a friend for cash to take Royalty for a day at Six Flags because she couldn’t afford the tickets.  Nia wants to take her daughter to theme parks, like Lego Land, but claims that she can’t afford anything extra on such a tight budget.

As for her own income, Nia says she only makes around $400 per month from an online clothing store inspired by Royalty.

The judge in the case agreed with Nia, but couldn’t order the new support amount because the court needs to review all the financial documents about Brown’s income. A decision could come as early as next week.

This isn’t the first time Brown and his baby mama have been at odds over money. Last year Nia filed documents claiming she was unable to support Royalty on the $2,500 per month, but later dropped the case without an increase.