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Shannen Doherty Says Her Private Information Was Leaked By Insurance Company In Legal Battle

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By Ryan Naumann

Shannen Doherty is demanding State Farm be sanctioned $10,000 for releasing her private home address in their ongoing court battle.

According to court documents obtained by The Blast, Doherty is accusing State Farm Insurance of leaking her private home address and 70 photos of her property despite promising to keep it all under wraps.

The actress is suing State Farm for allegedly not paying for damage caused to her Malibu home from the Woolsey Fire. State Farm says they have paid her millions but deny owing her more money. The case is headed to trial.

In newly filed documents, Doherty says State Farm recently filed motions that included her private home address without redaction. She says this is a direct violation of the protective order in place.

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She says State Farm argues she waived her rights to privacy because she disclosed her cancer relapse. Doherty believes this argument is absurd and wants the insurance company to pay $10,000 in sanctions.

Recently, Doherty revealed her cancer has returned and came back aggressive. She said she is dying from stage 4 cancer.

Doherty was diagnosed with breast cancer in 2015, which spread to her lymph nodes. She underwent a single mastectomy in 2016. She announced her cancer was in remission in April 2017. State Farm asked the court to not allow Doherty to bring up her cancer during the trial.

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In her original lawsuit, Doherty said, “State Farm will take advantage of the vulnerability and distress of its policy holders when they find themselves in the very situations they paid thousands of dollars in premiums to insure against.”

The insurance company said they provided Doherty with temporary housing including a $35,000 rental home. They claimed in court docs, “As of September 11, 2019, State Farm has paid benefits totaling $1,084,948.01 to clean and repair plaintiff’s home and personal property, and for temporary housing and furniture rental.”

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