SEND US A TIP!CLICK OR 844.412.5278

Canada Won't Send Athletes To 2020 Olympics, Trump Says He'll Follow Japan's Guidance

Gettyimages | CHARLY TRIBALLEAU
By Clark Sparky

Team Canada officially announced its decision on Sunday to not send any of the country's athletes to the 2020 Tokyo Olympics if the Games are not postponed.

Giphy | Team USA

They called on the organizers to postpone the Olympics for one year in a statement released by Team Canada.

"The COC and CPC urgently call on the International Olympic Committee (IOC), and the International Paralympic Committee (IPC) and the World Health Organization (WHO) to postpone the Games for one year and we offer them our full support in helping navigate all the complexities that rescheduling the Games will bring," it reads "While we recognize the inherent complexities around a postponement, nothing is more important than the health and safety of our athletes and the world community."

The statement continued by noting that postponing the Games is the right move for both the athletes and the public.

"This is not solely about athlete health – it is about public health. With COVID-19 and the associated risks, it is not safe for our athletes, and the health and safety of their families and the broader Canadian community for athletes to continue training towards these Games. In fact, it runs counter to the public health advice which we urge all Canadians to follow."

Gettyimages | Alex Wong

On Monday, Donald Trump tweeted that the U.S. will follow guidance from Japan about whether or not to send athletes.

"We will be guided by the wishes of Prime Minister Abe of Japan, a great friend of the United States and a man who has done a magnificent job on the Olympic Venue, as to attending the Olympic Games in Japan. He will make the proper decision!" Trump wrote.

Staying Safe

Heath officials are urging people to remain in their homes as much as possible and avoid all social gatherings. Additionally, the CDC has issued some tips for helping to avoid contracting the disease.

Avoid close contact with people who are sick.

Avoid touching your eyes, nose, and mouth.

Stay home when you are sick.

Cover your cough or sneeze with a tissue, then throw the tissue in the trash.

Clean and disinfect frequently touched objects and surfaces using a regular household cleaning spray or wipe.

CDC does not recommend that people who are well wear a facemask to protect themselves from respiratory diseases, including COVID-19.

Facemasks should be used by people who show symptoms of COVID-19 to help prevent the spread of the disease to others. The use of facemasks is also crucial for health workers and people who are taking care of someone in close settings (at home or in a health care facility).

Wash your hands often with soap and water for at least 20 seconds, especially after going to the bathroom; before eating; and after blowing your nose, coughing, or sneezing.

If soap and water are not readily available, use an alcohol-based hand sanitizer with at least 60% alcohol. Always wash hands with soap and water if hands are visibly dirty.

Load Comments
Next Article