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"This Mother’s Day is a little hard because my mother is very sick. A week ago she was diagnosed with Covid-19. Her line of work put her at a higher risk since she was working in activities and house keeping at an assisted living facility," he wrote. "My wife and I have been trying to help by dropping off food (curbside) so she could focus on getting rest. We haven’t hugged her in about 3 months & we haven’t had her over inside our home for about 3 months. This has been extremely hard for all of us."

He continued, "Our youngest daughter has an immunodeficiency disorder where she gets sick so easily so we have stayed home and took this quarantine very seriously. We have had to go to store a few times (kid free of course) however, I knew my mother would be exposed at some point due to her job which was very worrisome itself."

"Now, with a confirmed case of covid-19 we are worried more and limited on what we can do to help. She has good days and of course bad days like today. Her and Jody live together and I knew it would only be a matter of time before he would get it, and of course.... I believe he has it now. He has the symptoms, but hasn’t had the test yet," he added.

"So I will be dropping off breakfast in the morning on the porch and wishing her a Happy Mother’s Day while praying for her. All prayers are welcomed and much appreciated. Happy Mother’s Day to all the beautiful mothers and a BIG Happy Mother’s Day to my amazing wife."

To date, nearly 85,000 Americans have died of COVID-19.

The CDC has issued some tips for helping to avoid contracting the disease.

Avoid close contact with people who are sick.

Avoid touching your eyes, nose, and mouth.

Stay home when you are sick.

Cover your cough or sneeze with a tissue, then throw the tissue in the trash.

Clean and disinfect frequently touched objects and surfaces using a regular household cleaning spray or wipe.

Facemasks should be used by people who show symptoms of COVID-19 to help prevent the spread of the disease to others. The use of facemasks is also crucial for health workers and people who are taking care of someone in close settings (at home or in a health care facility).

Wash your hands often with soap and water for at least 20 seconds, especially after going to the bathroom; before eating; and after blowing your nose, coughing, or sneezing.

If soap and water are not readily available, use an alcohol-based hand sanitizer with at least 60% alcohol. Always wash hands with soap and water if hands are visibly dirty.

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