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Kareem Abdul-Jabbar Defends Gayle King From 'Misogynist' Attacks By Snoop Dogg And 50 Cent

Gettyimages | Rich Fury
By Clark Sparky

Gayle King experienced intense backlash over the past week after a clip of an interview she did with Lisa Leslie was shared on social media. In the segment, King asked Leslie how the 2003 rape allegations against Kobe Bryant impact is legacy.

Many people agreed that the line of questioning was inappropriate, but some celebrities took their attacks too far.

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Snoop Dogg and 50 Cent both shared posts social media attacking King and calling her a "bitch." Snoop has since apologized for his words.

On Thursday, NBA great and activist Kareem Abdul-Jabbar wrote a column for the Hollywood Reporter explaining why their words were so damaging.

"When a man calls a woman a bitch because she does something he doesn’t like, he is nourishing the already rampant misogyny in society," he wrote. "But when a black man does it, he is perpetuating negative stereotypes about how black men perceive and treat women. That is harmful to the entire African-American community. Snoop Dogg has 39.1 million followers on Instagram and 50 Cent has 25.3 million followers on Twitter. When they send out to their followers a threatening and abusive tirade, they are influencing a younger generation of men to continue to refer to women who don’t do what men want as bitches. Worse, King started receiving death threats."

Giphy | SHOWTIME Sports

He continued: "Several celebrities came to King’s defense, including Oprah Winfrey, Senator Cory Booker, former national security advisor Susan Rice, and others. To his credit, Snoop Dogg has since apologized for his comments, admitting he overreacted: 'I would like to apologize to you publicly for the language that I used and calling you out of your name and just being disrespectful.' He also said, 'When you’re wrong, you gotta fix it.' That’s something Kobe would have agreed with."

He went on to explain how the 2003 rape case ultimately made Bryant a better person.

Fame is unforgiving. Most people who make mistakes in their lives have a degree of privacy within which they can heal and redeem themselves. With the famous, nothing is forgotten and rarely is anything forgiven. Kobe did indeed go through an accusation which he said was consensual, but still was adultery. That was 17 years ago, when he was only 24. The case was dismissed and Kobe redeemed himself many times over with his exemplary life since. To me, Kobe was even more exceptional because he learned from his mistakes and devoted himself to being a better person. Few have that kind of strength, courage, or commitment. We can love and respect Kobe without canonizing him as perfect. Death often immortalizes the ideal rather than the real. But it was the real Kobe, flaws and all, that we should love.

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